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The Most Common Nutritional Deficiencies in the US

June 29, 2017 by CGN_2015

The Most Common Nutritional Deficiencies in the US

The United States has access to more food than many other countries, but many of its citizens are still lacking essential vitamins in their diet. The most common vitamin deficiencies in the US are listed below.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is found in most foods, so a deficiency in this vitamin is usually a result of poor nutrition. Since processing food can remove vitamin B6, people with a B6 deficiency should avoid processed foods and eat more nutritious, whole foods. Symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency can include depression, confusion, and even seizures — in extreme cases.

Iron

Although many cases of iron deficiency, or anemia, go unnoticed, iron deficiency can cause serious side effects if left untreated. Symptoms include fatigue, pale skin, weakness, shortness of breath, and chest pain. The deficiency can be corrected by eating more meat, eggs, and leafy green vegetables.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is critical to build strong bones, but many Americans suffer from a vitamin D deficiency. Luckily, it is easy to increase the vitamin D in your system by getting plenty of healthy sunlight exposure and eating fish, fish oils, cheese, and fortified milk.

Calcium

Another vitamin that is critical to bone health is calcium. Many Americans do not get enough calcium in their diets. People can increase their calcium intake easily by drinking milk or eating foods like cheese, yogurt, and broccoli.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C plays an important role in producing hormones, collagen, carnitine, and amino acids, which help the body function properly. Although many Americans do not get a sufficient amount of vitamin C in their diets, they can increase their vitamin C levels by eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, particularly citrus fruits.

Although these nutritional deficiencies are common in the US, they can easily be corrected. By eating a more balanced diet or taking a good mineral and vitamin supplement, people can get the vitamins they need to lead a healthy lifestyle.

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References

Johnson, Larry; Vitamin B6; Merck Manual; accessed September 23, 2015

Johnson, Larry; Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid); Merck Manual; accessed September 23, 2015

Magee, Elaine; Vitamin D Deficiency; WebMD; accessed September 23, 2015

Mayo Clinic Staff; Iron Deficiency Anemia; Mayo Clinic; accessed September 23, 2015

Staff; Calcium Vitamins and Supplements Lifestyle Guide; WebMD; accessed September 23, 2015

Staff; CDC’s Second Nutrition Report: A Comprehensive Biochemical Assessment of the Nutrition Status of the U.S. Population; Center for Disease Control; accessed September 23, 2015

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Common Sense Ways to Deal with Fatigue

June 29, 2017 by CGN_2015

mid adult italian business woman banging her head against a wall outside office building. Square shape, copy space

Do you feel that you don’t have as much energy as you would like? If so, you have company. Fatigue is one of the most common complaints that people bring to physicians. It seems that almost everyone today feels low-energy, stressed, and worn out.

Unfortunately, there are no easy solutions to this common problem. While many medical conditions can cause fatigue, the overwhelming majority of people who experience fatigue do not have any illness that can be diagnosed. It seems most likely that the true cause of this widespread problem is modern life itself.

The body was not designed for a sedentary life. While today most of us might consider one hour of exercise daily to be ideal, in the past, eight hours of daily exercise was not uncommon. Our ancestors lived much of their lives outdoors and walked many miles every day.

Today, we live indoors, sit in chairs, and seldom walk more than a mile. Not only that, instead of peaceful outdoor surroundings, we live in a fast-paced, noisy world that interrupts us constantly with its demands and requires that we multitask our way through nerve-frazzling challenges. This way of life, in many ways, violates the body’s design principles.

Furthermore, with the invention of the electric light, the body’s normal sleep habits were replaced by progressively longer periods of wakefulness. Few people today get eight hours of sleep regularly, much less the 10 to 12 hours that some experts believe our ancestors ordinarily enjoyed (at least in winter).

Tiredness, in other words, is a consequence of numerous factors that confront us all, and for that reason it isn’t easy to fix.

If you frequently feel tired, you should begin with a medical exam to rule out identifiable medical conditions such as depression, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic viral hepatitis, hypothyroidism, and anemia. Problems such as these need to be addressed specifically in order to make any headway.

If you do not prove to have any identifiable illness, the next steps to take involve common sense principles. People with inadequate energy should increase the time they give themselves to sleep, exercise daily (as much as possible), and reduce bad habits, such as cigarette smoking and excessive consumption of alcohol.

Cutting down on coffee consumption may help too by improving sleep and decreasing stress. In addition, it is important not to neglect such fundamentals as enjoyable work, healthy relationships, and adequate recreation. Even very unhealthy people tend to have more energy when they love what they’re doing with their lives.

Nutrient deficiencies can also cause fatigue, and for this reason it may be useful to take supplements. Several studies indicate that marginal deficiency of iron, too slight to cause anemia, may decrease physical performance capacity.

In addition, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 144 women with unexplained fatigue who also had low or borderline-low levels of ferritin (a measure of stored iron) found that use of an iron supplement enhanced energy and well-being.
Nonetheless, it is not advisable to take iron just because you feel tired. Make sure to get tested to see whether you are indeed deficient. With iron, more is definitely not better.

Looking for products to help you keep a healthy balance in your life? Check out the California Gold Nutrition products sold exclusively on iHerb.com. New to iHerb? Use Rewards Code CGN999 to get up to $10 off your first order.

Note: This article was encapsulated from a longer article in the iHerb Healthy Library; copyright EBSCO Publishing; Accessed Sept. 23, 2015. For the complete article including references, see:

http://healthlibrary.epnet.com/GetContent.aspx?token=e0498803-7f62-4563-8d47-5fe33da65dd4&chunkiid=38391

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What is Himalayan Sea Salt?

June 29, 2017 by CGN_2015

What is Himalayan Sea Salt?

Himalayan sea salt is harvested from the salt caves formed millions of years ago following the receding of the world’s oceans. Mostly found in the Himalayan mountain range, it generally has a pink hue and is adored by chefs and organic foodies the world over. While the health benefits are debatable, its unique flavor has won over many taste buds.

Potential Health Benefits

The biggest difference between regular table salt and Himalayan sea salt is the vast array of minerals, including zinc, boron, bromine and phosphorus, plus the iron oxide that give the salt its pink hue. While this may sound good, scientists are quick to point out that most Americans are not deficient in these minerals. In addition, most of us consume better sources of them in our meats, grains and vegetables.

Processing the Salt

Himalayan salt is less processed, but the difference in treatment does not necessarily mean increased health benefits. Table salt is treated so that there are no pollutants and anti-caking ingredients are added.

Even so, there is an advantage to choosing Himalayan. Because the granules are much larger, people tend to eat less of it, effectively lowering sodium intake, a practice that is healthy for the heart.

Healing Properties

Himalayan pink salt caves are also popular places for those with skin conditions or allergies. Evidence for or against this is extremely limited. There remains the potential for healing properties but none have been verified through studies.

Looking for products to help you keep a healthy balance in your life? Check out the California Gold Nutrition products sold exclusively on iHerb.com. New to iHerb? Use Rewards Code CGN999 to get $5 off your first order. No minimum purchase.

References

Triffin, Molly; Does Himalayan Pink Salt Hold Up To All The Health Hype?; Yahoo! Health; accessed August 24, 2015

Hall, Harriet; Pass the Salt (But Not That Pink Himalayan Stuff); Science-Based Medicine; accessed August 24, 2015

 

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Vitamin C to Boost Immunity and Fight Fatigue

June 29, 2017 by CGN_2015

Vitamin C to Boost Immunity and Fight Fatigue

When thinking of vitamin C most people immediately think of citrus fruits such as lemons or beverages like orange juice. However, a whole host of fruits and vegetables contain vitamin C. You’ll also find it in many nutritional supplements and multivitamin packs. Still, it is possible to end up with a vitamin C deficiency, especially if you’re on a diet for weight loss or a restricted diet due to allergies or food intolerance. Please also note that if you smoke cigarettes, you are at a higher risk of vitamin C deficiency.

Use this guide to help you learn about the signs of vitamin C deficiency.

Fatigue

If you’re not getting enough vitamin C in your diet, one of the first things you might notice could be your inability to stay awake or a general feeling of fatigue. Fatigue is common with almost every vitamin deficiency, though it’s often the first symptom of vitamin C related issues.

Frequent Infections

Vitamin C helps to boost the immune system and keep infections at bay. If you’re not getting enough vitamin C you may notice that you have to take more antibiotics and that you may have repeated illnesses such as chronic sinus infections.

Increasing your intake of vitamin C is often helpful when you’re sick, but if you have a deficiency, you should notice a change quickly once you’re getting enough in your diet.

Dry Hair

When you’re not getting enough vitamin C in your diet you might find that your hair suffers before anything else. That’s because vitamin C helps to keep your hair healthy and strong, and without it, you might notice a lot of split ends. Dry spots on the scalp and overly dry hair are also common among people who aren’t getting enough vitamin C in their diets.

Dental Problems

Your teeth probably won’t fall out because you have a vitamin C deficiency, but bleeding gums are a sign that you could be deficient. Increase your intake of vitamin C and this should go away quickly.

Please also note that if you smoke cigarettes, you are at a higher risk of vitamin C deficiency.

Check out California Gold Nutrition’s selection of Vitamin C products sold exclusively through iHerb! New to iHerb? Use Rewards Code CGN999 to get $5 off your first order. No minimum purchase.

References

Medline Plus Editors; Vitamin C; Medline Plus; accessed September 20, 2015

Larry E. Johnson, M.D., PhD; Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid); Merck Manuals; accessed September 20, 2015

FitDay Editors; 8 Symptoms of Vitamin C Deficiency; FitDay; accessed September 20, 2015

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Superfoods that Work Even Better Together!

June 29, 2017 by CGN_2015

Superfoods that Work Even Better Together!

You probably know that superfoods are vitamin- and antioxidant-rich choices that have a positive health impact. However, did you know that some superfoods work better in combination with others, unlocking even greater health benefits?

Read on to learn about some of these “superstar combos.”

Black Beans with Red Bell Peppers

While black beans are an ideal source of iron, the type of iron consumed from plant-based sources isn’t as easy for the body to use as iron that comes from animal sources. That’s where red bell peppers come in. These and other foods rich in vitamin C allow your body to absorb as much as six times more plant-based iron.

Nuts with Fruit

Peanuts, almonds, and other types of nuts are rich in vitamin E. For an even greater boost to your immune system, pair them with vitamin C-rich vegetables, such as strawberries, oranges and other citrus fruits, and guava.

Tomatoes and Avocado

The lycopene in tomatoes, an antioxidant that helps reduce the risk of certain types of cancers, needs to be combined with fat for best absorption by the body. This also holds true for many other vitamins that are common to fruits and vegetables. Choose monounsaturated fats, such as those in avocado, which is also packed with vitamins and minerals.

Green Leafy Veggies with Nuts

This combination is a key to heart health. Choose greens that are rich in vitamin K, like kale, spinach, Swiss chard, broccoli, cabbage and Brussel sprouts, and then pair them with nuts, packed with healthy fat — including almonds, walnuts, and cashews.

Oatmeal and Oranges

Whole grain oats have a heart healthy impact, but this benefit is compounded when you add citrus. By drinking a glass of orange juice with your oatmeal, you’re paving the way for stable cholesterol levels, which help prevent clogged arteries.

Looking for products to help you keep a healthy balance in your life? Check out the California Gold Nutrition products sold exclusively on iHerb.com. New to iHerb? Use Rewards Code CGN999 to get $5 off your first order. No minimum purchase.

References

Food Synergy: 8 Healthy Food Pairings That Are Even Better Together. The Huffington Post. 9/12/2012. Accessed 9/2/15.

Kobylas, Taylar; 5 Superfood Pairings That Work Better Together. Accessed 1/15/15. Accessed 9/2/15.

Swalin, Rachel; 11 Superfoods That Work Better Together. Accessed 9/2/15.

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