Bone and Joint

Bone isn’t just a solid hunk of calcium. It’s living, growing tissue with a soft core and a hard framework of calcium phosphate. Because bone is alive, it’s constantly breaking down its old framework and replacing it with new material.

Until you’re…

Bone isn’t just a solid hunk of calcium. It’s living, growing tissue with a soft core and a hard framework of calcium phosphate. Because bone is alive, it’s constantly breaking down its old framework and replacing it with new material.

Until you’re about 30, you make bone faster than it is destroyed. But after that, the process slowly reverses, causing a net bone loss. If the loss becomes severe, bones lose density, becoming more porous and fragile. When bones become porous enough, they are more vulnerable to fractures, even under the normal conditions of everyday living.

Where the bones meet, a joint is made. Every movement that we make involves the action of a joint. Repetitive movements, especially in joints that bear weight, demand much from those joints. They are made up of the ends of two bones which are held together by tough strands of connective tissue known as fibrous ligaments. They are further supported by surrounding muscles and the tendons that attach muscle to bone. Regardless of the origin, the process of joint destruction tends to be cumulative and progressive.

Natural treatment of osteoarthritis gained significant attention with the introduction of glucosamine sulfate in the 1980’s. Glucosamine is a small molecule that stimulates the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), the main proteoglycan in joint cartilage. Proteoglycans cushion the joint and their presence is critical to pain-free, fluid movement. Glucosamine also helps stabilize the scaffolding of cartilage, namely the fibrous collagen.

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